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Single Channel: Video Art Festival

May 12 May 13, 2018

May 12 and 13
Doors at 2pm, Screening at 2:30pm
At Anthology Film Archives
32 2nd Ave, New York, NY 10003
Free and open to the public

Single Channel 2018 is a video art and short film festival that will screen the work of 19 artists. The festival, with a focus on emerging and under-represented artists, provides the context for single channel video work and short film to be screened outside of exhibition spaces in a more suitable context. NURTUREart’s Single Channel offers uninterrupted and undisturbed viewing and listening experiences to come to full fruition—acknowledging the exceptionality of video art and short film by presenting them on a large screen. Participants are selected through a free open call.

Curated by Vanessa Albury, Ivan Gilbert, and William Penrose.
Each 60 minute screening will be followed by a conversation with participating artists.

Saturday, May 12 Program
featuring works by 

Rob Carter
Fiona Cashell
Michael Hanna
Franck Lesbros
Dana Levy
Cole Lu
Jeremy Olson
Mauricio Saenz
Jan Staller
Ezra Wube

Sunday, May 13 Program
featuring works by

Collin Bradford
Valery Jung Estabrook
Autumn Knight and Chelsea Knight
Katy McCarthy
Mores McWreath
Joiri Minaya
Bárbara Oettinger
Rachel Rampleman
Hidemi Takagi

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Saturday, May 12 Program

.Featuring
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Mauricio Saenz
Dakhla, 2016, single channel video, 5:40 min.
artist’s website

Dakhla reflects on the concept of uncertainty and the imprecision of a changing reality as an ever-present confrontation. Through a narrative that describes a metaphoric trip to the middle of the sea, ephemerality and unpredictabilty emphasize the idea of a future guided by chance and speculation.

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Dana Levy   
Eden Without Eve, 2016, single channel video, 4:44 min.
artist’s website

A short documentary about life in the Everglades National Park on “Loop Road”. As a female moving-image artist, Dana Levy takes on the role of an anthropologist, observing the men, who have learned to exist in the wild, and how they interact with their surroundings.

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Rob Carter
Catawba, 2017, single channel video, 6:00 min.
artist’s website

Catawba shares its name with the river: a vital resource of the Carolinas. This portrait of a river—a cradle for energy resources and a site for human construction and redesign for over a century—registers corporate development and the remnants of a past.

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Fiona Cashell
Horizon Lines, 2015, single channel video, 5:52 min.
artist’s website

Time is infinite. It expands and it contracts, is still and moves. It has no edges and connects us. Memory is its container. I go to that place you know. The place you always knew. I know it now also. I look to the Horizon for you, but you are gone. I am looking for something else. What is it?

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Cole Lu
But, You Know, It’s Often All I Want, 2015, single channel video, 3:42 min.
artist’s website

Lu’s video uses fragmental collage to explore the disjunction of language and emotional translation. It integrates YouTube tutorial, voiceover, animation and sign language as queer evidence and gestures for cultural and linguistic adaptation.

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Ezra Wube
Twilight Galaxies, 2017, single channel video, 7:56 min.
artist’s website

Inspired by his visits to immigrant holiday ceremonies, Wube features in his video the common objects used at these gatherings. The objects, echoing the transitory state of the ceremonies, become new icons that defy a specific cultural association—becoming transmitters for a possible utopia through interaction, exchange, and unstill-ness.

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Jan Staller
Ice, 2015, single channel video, 7:01 min.
artist’s website

Ice was made on the banks of the Hudson River in lower Manhattan during a prolonged cold snap in the winter of 2015. Score composed by Michael Gordon, Light is Calling.

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Franck Lesbros
InLight Empire, 2015, single channel video, 8:49 min.
artist’s website

InLight Empire, a visual and sound experience, is an exploration and discovery of architecture and light in movement. The cathartic trip, with dust, water, and insects, ends with a finality quiet and peaceful.

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Micheal Hanna
Behavior Setting, 2014, single channel video, 4:07 min.
artist’s website

The imagery used in Behaviour Setting are appropriated from a wide range of sources including optical illusions, particle physics engines, crowd analysis software and microscopic imagery. The material is batch processed to uniformity, producing a psychological probing.

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Jeremy Olson
in the leaves, 2016, single channel video, 4:44 min.
artist’s website

Shot entirely in city parks and zoos, in the leaves is a short film about plant and animal life in the urban landscape, complicity, and loss.

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Sunday, May 13 Program

Featuring
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Katy McCarthy
Mary Todd Lincoln or Why I Couldn’t Finish the Video In Time, 2017, single channel video, 7:09 min.
artist’s website

McCarthy says, “I understand history best by becoming my research subjects: my hypochondria really helps me get into character. Sometimes my anxiety lampoons my research, and other times it becomes the framework for a video.”

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Valery Jung Estabrook
Twinkies, Wasps, and Avatars, 2015–2016, single channel video, 11:31 min.
artist’s website

Deconstructing and reconciling “Asian American” and “American Southerner” identities in three chapters, this video reveals hidden personal histories, states of psychological exile, selfhood in the in-between, and longing without belonging.

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Joiri Minaya
Binólogos (I, II, III), 2013, single channel video, 12:24 min.
artist’s website

Binólogos creates immersive, surreal atmospheres where male and female characters interact in ways that embody, combine or reverse traditional gender roles. The performative body reveals its limitations while disrupting social constructions in relation to our biological capacities.

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Bárbara Oettinger
Far is here, 2015, single channel video, 6:07 min.
artist’s website

In Far is here a Haitian man describes his immigration experience to Chile while he works in a bakery. His testimony and silence portray the complex situations he has faced since leaving the city of Fort Liberty in Haiti, until his arrival to Santiago of Chile.

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Mores McWreath
Spots, 2016–2017, single channel video, 4:00 min.
artist’s website

The Spots series is a group of 15 second videos posted weekly to social media that use the artist’s white masculine body to make visible white defenses and abuses of power across the political spectrum. By excavating his own fears and desires the artist hopes to project them out into the world to contribute to a larger dialogue and critique.

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Autumn Knight and Chelsea Knight
Instructions for a Fight, 2017, single channel video, 4:09 min.
Autumn Knight’s website, Chelsea Knight’s website

Instructions for a Fight encapsulates a range of the politics of resentment manifest through cooption techniques, oppressive policies, and seemingly benign reenactments. Dubbed with the voice of the instructor, the documentation explores the way that the language around violence is gendered and how that language is translated and inscribed onto our bodies.

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Rachel Rampleman
Bellmer Burlesque, 2013, single channel video, 4:02 min.
artist’s website

Common in many of Rampleman’s videos, Bellmer Burlesque exhibits repetitive motion that borders on the hypnotic. This video pays tribute to Hans Bellmer’s 1936 book La Poupée (The Doll). Rampleman’s technique allows her to bisect and mirror lower bodies, resulting in an animated, re-imagination of Bellmer’s dolls.

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Collin Bradford
End Light, 2016, single channel video, 11:07 min.
artist’s website

A massive automated library storage system roamed by a robot crane acts as an embodiment of the culmination of the Enlightenment project’s collection, categorization, organization, and storage of knowledge dominated by science, math, and reason. End Light uses this system as a metaphor for the collision, accelerated by technology, globalization, and the internet, between modernist rationalism and postmodern fluidity.

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Hidemi Takagi
Yachiyo – The Prologue, 2016, single channel video, 6:36 min.
artist’s website

Takagi captures the daily life of 92-year-old Yachiyo, who is Japanese American, living in Harlem’s housing project since 1960. She was born in L.A. and came to New York City after she experienced Japanese Interment Camp in Arizona during World War II.

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